TYPO3 Code of Conduct

Candidate for Review, September 2021

This draft was created and unanimously agreed upon by the Ombudsperson Group (Mathias Bolt Lesniak, Oliver Klee, Petra Hasenau, and Thomas Löffler) on 19 August 2021. On 25 August 2021, it was reviewed by the TYPO3 Association Board and approved for review by the TYPO3 community.

The Short Version

Be constructive and considerate, respect other people's boundaries.
Consider your actions—are they OK?

Preface

The Code of Conduct is here to ensure everyone feels safe and welcome in the TYPO3 community. It defines general rules and gives advice on how to behave.

Don’t be afraid to be yourself, but be your best. You are a free individual with the right to your own personal views and values. However, you also have the responsibility to treat people with respect.

This Code is using general terms and expects you to judge each situation by yourself. Even when acting with the best intentions, please understand that others might judge a situation differently to you. Stop when asked to. That’s your warning. You shouldn’t need more.

Local law might be more restrictive than this Code.

Applicability and Scope

This Code of Conduct applies to all persons present at or in the following:

  • Official TYPO3 events
  • Official TYPO3 community events (e.g. team sprints)
  • Official TYPO3 communication platforms (e.g. Slack)
  • Interaction between community members
  • Other events that explicitly declare that the CoC applies.

This also includes sponsors, speakers, and staff at events.

The Code of Conduct contains two sections:

  1. The Basic Rules are binding and should always be followed. Going against them will have consequences.
  2. General Advice illustrates ideals we strive to uphold. You’re expected to try your best, but nobody is perfect.

Basic Rules

We hold these rules to be self-evident:

  1. Treat all community members with respect, regardless of race, gender identity, age, sexual orientation, disability, physical appearance, national origin, ethnicity, beliefs, religion, etc.
  2. Respect bodily integrity and refrain from physically intrusive behavior.
  3. Do not start, continue, or encourage personal attacks, flame wars, and trolling.
  4. We do not tolerate harassment, personal attacks, or demeaning behavior. This includes intrusive photography or recording, unwanted sexual attention, and deliberate stalking or following.
  5. Do not disrupt talks and other organized events.
  6. Use valid contact information (e.g. Slack, e-mail, etc.) to which direct responses can be made.

General Advice

Try to …

  1. Give credit when it is deserved.
  2. Ask for help when you are unsure.
  3. Get outside help if you are stuck in a disagreement.
  4. Be respectful of people’s volunteer time.
  5. Be positive and give constructive feedback.
  6. Be aware that language can be difficult—sarcasm and irony is not understood by everyone.

Handling Violations

Contact in Case of Presumed Code of Conduct Violations

In case of a presumed Code violation, please contact the event staff, or a TYPO3 Association ombudsperson. The ombudspersons can always be contacted at ombudsperson@typo3.org.

Due Process and Right to Appeal

Reported cases are reviewed, without undue delay, by at least two TYPO3 Association ombudspersons. The review process should not usually take longer than two weeks.

In case of a suspected violation, all parties have a right to be heard during the review process. The ombudspersons may interview additional witnesses at their own discretion.

Event organizers or platform admins may limit a person’s access to the event or platform while a case is being reviewed. Any right to refund of event fees, etc. must be specified in the event’s refund policy.

All decisions made by the ombudspersons can be appealed to the TYPO3 Association Board. The Board’s decisions are final.

Reactions to Violations

Reactions to a breach of this Code depend on the type, seriousness, and context of the violation. Typical reactions are defined and published by the TYPO3 Association Board and might span from a formal warning to a time-limited exclusion from some or all platforms.

Frequently Asked Questions

Commentary and frequently asked questions to the Code of Conduct.

Basic rule #1: Treat all community members with respect …

Treat all community members with respect, regardless of race, gender identity, age, sexual orientation, disability, physical appearance, national origin, ethnicity, beliefs, religion, etc.

1. What does it mean to “behave respectfully”?

It means that you think about what you say before you say it and consider the results of your actions. Could it hurt someone? Certain words and actions may have meanings that go beyond what you intend.

2. Who are “community members” and who are not?

Generally speaking, if you are at the premises of a TYPO3 event or on a platform listed in the section Applicability and Scope, everyone you meet and interact with should be considered community members.

If you meet community members outside of these settings, they are still community members who can invoke the Code of Conduct. This is because the fear of repeated disrespectful behavior can discourage their participation in the TYPO3 community events and platforms.

3. How do you differentiate between “beliefs” and “religion”?

Where you draw the line is up to you. The Code of Conduct applies to both. In some contexts these words have the same meaning, but “beliefs” also encompasses temporal (non-religious) convictions, likes, and dislikes. For example, which political party or CMS is the best.

4. What does the “etc” imply?

The Code of Conduct requires you to show your fellow human beings respect. The “etc” (or “et cetera”) indicates that the list of items is not complete. You might think of more similar words, and they are also included. You can’t behave disrespectfully in a certain way just because it isn’t in the list.

Basic rule #2: Respect bodily integrity …

Respect bodily integrity and refrain from physically intrusive behavior.

1. What does “respect bodily integrity” mean?

Basically don’t touch anyone without them having given you permission to do so.

Also consider that most people maintain a buffer zone or intimate zone around their body. Deliberately moving within this zone can be experienced as uncomfortable and a breach of integrity.

2. What is “physically intrusive behavior”?

Doing anything that makes the other person want to move away or wish you weren’t there, such as deliberately following, stalking, threatening, or continuing a conversation when the other person has asked you to stop.

3. Can’t I give people a hug or kiss?

You can give a hug or kiss to everyone who answers “yes” when you ask them “may I give you a hug/kiss”. Hugging and kissing are more common in some cultures, but some people find it a breach of their personal integrity. 

A consent to a hug can also be non-verbal. If you approach someone with arms wide open and they open their arms in return, they are consenting to a hug. If they keep their arms down, their are not up for a hug right now.

Basic rule #3: Do not start, continue, or encourage …

Do not start, continue, or encourage personal attacks, flame wars, and trolling.

1. What is a “flamewar”?

Also known as “roasting”, this is to use insults, hostile language, or offensive words against or between people. It is often seen online, but the Code of Conduct covers both online and offline situations.

2. What is “trolling”?

In our context, trolling is to deliberately provoke emotional reactions, manipulate or derail a conversation or discussion by inserting off-topic, insincere, or excessive arguments, or by being unnecessarily argumentative.

Even if your contributions are sincere and have the best intentions, people can perceive it as trolling. Be sensitive and stop unproductive arguments and don’t repeat yourself unnecessarily. If someone tells you to stop trolling, take a minute to consider why that might be. Step down gracefully.

3. How can I defend TYPO3 while staying compliant with this rule?

Defending the product or community should never be done by demeaning or attacking other people. Only argue facts. For example, using bad words about someone will neither further the conversation nor defend the product. Saying “what you're saying is wrong because X, Y, Z” is the way to handle it. If the other party doesn't drop the topic, you drop the topic. Say: “I don't think we are getting anywhere with this discussion. I won't make any further replies.”

Basic rule #4: We do not tolerate …

We do not tolerate harassment, personal attacks, or demeaning behavior. This includes intrusive photography or recording, unwanted sexual attention, and deliberate stalking or following.

1. What does “we do not tolerate” entail?

If you see a Code of Conduct violation that falls under this clause, please consider speaking up against it or contacting the ombudspersons or event organizers.

2. What does “demeaning” mean?

It means to use words to frighten, humiliate, belittle, or degrade other people. Given emotional stress or anger, it isn’t always premeditated. It is our job as fellow TYPO3 community members to be constructive and stop it.

3. Isn’t the meaning the same as that of rule #3?

While rule #3 disallows participation, this rule covers more serious situations. While trolls are better left alone, those bystanders who feel safe to do so might consider intervening to stop ongoing harassment or unwanted sexual attention

Basic rule #5: Do not disrupt …

Do not disrupt talks and other organized events.

No frequently asked questions available.

Basic rule #6: Use valid contact information …

Use valid contact information (e.g. Slack, e-mail, etc.) to which direct responses can be made.

1. Do I really have to tell you who I am?

No, you don’t have to publish your real name or any sensitive personal information. However, we expect that your active participation in the community is a two-way conversation, not a monolog. If you want to voice your opinion, please take part in a fruitful and constructive discussion.

2. Does this prevent me from contributing anonymously to TYPO3?

No. You can contribute code or money anonymously. However, the moment you voice an opinion or respond to others, we require you to be able to receive responses from others.

General advice #1: Give credit …

Give credit when it is deserved.

1. Where do I draw the line? Should I always thank my parents?

Include anyone directly involved in or who directly inspired your work. In the case of code contribution, you might choose to credit the person or people who:

  • Gave you the idea
  • Gave you advice
  • Wrote the code you improved
  • Helped with coding
  • Reviewed your code
  • Sponsors

2. How do I give credit?

This depends on context. Ask around or spend a little time looking at how other people have done it.

General advice #2: Ask for help …

Ask for help when you are unsure.

1. Where should I ask for help?

This depends on context, but feel free to ask the community—even if your question is “where do I ask for help about this”. The Help and Support page has some good suggestions.

2. Can I ask about anything that’s relevant?

Yes. We all start out asking questions before we know enough to answer questions from others. And it never stops: Even the most experienced TYPO3 community members ask questions.

General advice #3: Get outside help …

Get outside help if you are stuck in a disagreement.

1. Where should I ask for help?

Free to contact someone you know in the community or contact the TYPO3 ombudspersons.

General advice #4: Be respectful …

Be respectful of people’s volunteer time.

1. How do I know that someone is volunteering their time?

Assume they are volunteers until you are certain they aren’t. Asking people is a good place to start.

2. How can I be respectful?

Don’t ask or expect too much. Consider sponsoring a feature or bug fix.

3. Why do you only mention volunteer time?

Everyone should be mindful of other people's time. However, when speaking about the same task, volunteer time has a very different quality to paid time. Example: Repeatedly asking urgent questions and expecting immediate answers from volunteer community members would violate this section in the Code of Conduct. Doing the same with paid support would be a matter for your terms of service agreement.

General advice #5: Be positive …

Be positive and give constructive feedback.

1. What do you mean by “constructive feedback”?

Rather than just saying that something is wrong, explain how it can become better.

General advice #6: Be aware that language …

Be aware that language can be difficult—sarcasm and irony is not understood by everyone.

1. How can language be difficult?

Language can be difficult to understand, especially if it is a foreign language. Using complicated and uncommon words can make it especially difficult to understand what is being said. Some people also find reading or hearing difficult.

2. What is “irony”?

It might be (sometimes darkly) funny when something ends up the exact opposite of what you would normally have expected. It is ironic when the code change that is supposed to fix a hundred bugs instead introduces a hundred more bugs.

3. What is “sarcasm”?

Sarcasm is when you say one thing, but mean the opposite. When speaking, we sometimes use a different intonation or pitch to underscore that we’re saying something sarcastic. When writing, we sometimes indicate sarcasm by putting a word within quote marks.

Let’s say you are stuck in a long queue of people and you’re very bored. Saying “this is so fun” sarcastically might underscore that the experience is absolutely not fun at all.

4. Why doesn't everyone understand irony and sarcasm?

Lack of fluency in a language can make it hard to detect the subtle hints of sarcastic remarks. Others find sarcasm difficult due to mental disabilities or disorders.